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Number Search Terms Search Index Title Authors Year Source Volume Page ISBN or ISSN Call Number Subject terms Country State (Province) Subheading Document Type Library Library Website Abstract
1 Lake Ontario   Changes in the Biota in Lakes Erie and Ontario ed. By Dr. Robert A. Sweeney 1968 Bulletin of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences 25 no1 84p DBCN 05-0013874 QH1.B94 v.25,no.1 Freshwater biology--Lake Ontario         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
2 Lake Ontario   Proceedings of the conference on changes in the physical aspects of Lakes Erie and Ontario, November 1-2, 1973 ed. By Dr. Robert A. Sweeney 1973 Bulletin of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences 25 no3 93p DBCN 05-0017543 QH1.B94 v.25,no.3 Shorelines--Lake Ontario--Congresses         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
3 Lake Ontario   On the feasibility of predicting Lake Ontario water levels Frank Sciremammano, prepared under the direction of John H Thomas… and Alfred Clark 1975 University of Rochester, College of Engineering and Applied Science none 19 leaves DBCN 05-0027154 Gov Doc 30-Le51 2:As12 Sc51/501 Hydrology--Lake Ontario, Water masses--Lake Ontario         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
4 Lake Ontario   A mathmatical model determining commercial expoliotation of Lake Ontario's multispecies fish community Susan G Staffoerd 1975 NYS Assembly, Public Service Legislative Studies program none 96 leaves DBCN 05-0027173 Gov Doc 30-Le51 2:As12 Sc51/511 Fisheries--Lake Ontario--Mathematical models, Fish populations--Mathematical models         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
5 Lake Ontario   The regulation of water levels on the Great Lakes: emphasis on Lake Ontario   1973 University of Rochester, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Sciences none 32 leaves DBCN 05-0027390 Gov Doc 30-Le51 2:As12/Sc51/305 Coastal zone management--New York State, Hydrology--Lake Ontario, Water Levels--Great Lakes         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
6 Lake Ontario   Water quality management plan for the Lake Ontario Basin: central (03-02), eastern (03-03), draft NYS Division of Land Resources and Forest Management 1977 The Divisions none 556p DCBN 05-00311756 Gov Doc 30-En61 2:On59/1 Water quality management--NYS--Lake Ontario watershed         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
7 Lake Ontario   Lake Ontario Authur Pound 1945 The Bobbs-Merrill company none 384p DCBN 05-0058111 F556.P6 Lake Ontario         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
8 Lake Ontario   Water quality trends in the Genesee River basin and lake Ontario basin in Monroe County Peter J. Hetzel 1975 Environmental Resource Center none 100 leaves DCBN 05-0088450 gen QH540.N4 no.54 Water quality--NYS--Lake Ontario Basin         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
9 Lake Ontario   Proceedings, Nov. 5-6, 1970 ed. By Dr. Robert A. Sweeney 1970 Conference on Changes in the Chemistry of Lakes Erie and Ontario 25 no2 85p DCBN 05-0135252 QH1 .B94 v.25, no.2 Limnology--Lake Ontario         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
10 Lake Ontario   Water pollution problems and improvement needs: Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River Basin US Federal Water Pollution Control Administration, Great Lakes Region 1968 NYS Divison of Pure Waters none 125p DCBN 05-0138716 gen TD225.O72 A57 Water--Pollution--Lake Ontario region, Water--Pollution--St. Lawrence River watershed         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
11 Lake Ontario   Annotated biblography of Lake Ontario limnological and related studies Great Lake Laboratory 1972 Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Monitoring multiple 3v. DCBN 05-0162611 ref Z1251.G8 O5 v.1-3 Limnology--Lake Ontario--Bibliography         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
12 Lake Ontario   Status Report: the problem of mirex in Lake Ontario Leo J. Hetling and Robert L. Collin 1978 Albany: NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation none 27p DCBN 05-0164317 Gov Doc 30-En61 5:53 Water--Pollution--Lake Ontario--Mirex         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
13 Lake Ontario   Water use relationships in the Genesse Valley and western Lake Ontario basin Erich F. Bordne 1954 Syracuse University--Thesis (Ph.D) none 250 leaves DCBN 05-0173940 gen TD224.N7 B67 1955a Water-supply--Genese River Valley (PA and NY)         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
14 Lake Ontario   Drift and dispersion characteristics of Lake Ontario nearshore waters, Rochester NY to Sodus Bay, NY: a special limnological study sponsored by Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation Pritchard-Carpenter (firm) 1965? Rochester Gas and Electric none 82 leaves DCBN 05-0173758 gen QH98.R6 Limnology--Lake Ontario         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
15 Lake Ontario   The Sterling power project: application Rochester Gas and Electric 1973 Rochester Gas and Electric multiple 5v. DCBN 05-0170817 gen HC110.E5 R52 v.1-5 Environmental policy--NYS--Lake Ontario, Pollution--NYS—Lake Ontario, Atomic power-plants--NYS--Cayuga County         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
16 Lake Ontario   Changes in the Biota in Lakes Erie and Ontario ed. By Roberta K. Cap and V. Ray Frederick Jr. 1980 Conference on Changes in the Chemistry of Lakes Erie and Ontario 25 no4 120p DCBN 05-0206097 QH1 .B94 v.25, no.4 Lake ecology--Lake Ontario--Congresses         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
17 Lake Ontario   Limnology and phytoplankton structure in nearshore areas of Lake Ontario ed. By Paul E. Bertram 1985 Environmental Protecation Agency, Great Lakes National Program Office none 172p DCBN 05-0237725 Gov Doc EP 1.2: L62/6 Limnology--Lake Ontario, Lake Ontario--Shorelines         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
18 Lake Ontario   Ecological studies of cooling water discharge John F. Storr 1973 Rochester Gas and Electric multiple 13v DCBN 05-0247720 gen QH541.5.F7 S8 1971 v.1, 1972 v.1-6, 1973 v.1-6 R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, Thermal pollution of rivers, lakes, ect.--Lake Ontario, Freshwater ecology--Lake Ontario--Nuclear Power Plants--Environmental aspects--Lake Ontario         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
19 Lake Ontario   A Prospectus for the management of the Long Point ecosystem Geaorge R. Francis 1985 Ann Arbor, Mich.: Great Lakes Fishery Commission none 109p DCBN 05-0266030 Gov Dov Y 3.G97f:43 Watershed management--Ontario--Long Point, Lake ecology--Lake Erie         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
20 Lake Ontario   Geneva's changing waterfront, 1779-1989 Kathryn Grover 1989 Geneva Hisorical Society none 106p DCBN 05-0286444 gen F129.G43 G7 1989 Waterfronts--NYS-Ontario County, Geneva (NY)--Description, Seneca Lake (NY)--History, Ontario County (NY)--History         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
21 Lake Ontario   The Cauga & Seneca Canal: with notes on the Crooked Lake Canal Thomas X. Grasso 1989 Canal Society of New York State none 65 leaves DCBN 05-0297280 gen HE396.C2 C2 1989 Canals--NYS, Cayuga and Seneca Canal (NY)--History, Crooked Lake Canal (NY)--History         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
22 Lake Ontario   Lakewide impacts of critical pollutants on the United States boundary waters of Lake Ontario Frederick Luckey 1994 Albany: NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation one 1v DCBN 05-0328797 Gov Doc ENV 214-4 LAKIC 94-28008 Water--Pollution--Lake Ontario, Water Quality Management         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
23 Lake Ontario   Rochester embayment remedial action plan: draft stage I ed. By Robert L. King and Rocco DiGiovanni 1993 Monroe Conty Dept. of Planning & Development multiple 2v DCBN 05-0316824 gen TD225.R63 R6 1993 v.1-2 Water quality management--NYS--Rochester Region--Planning, Water--Pollution--NYS--Rochester Region         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
24 Lake Ontario   Rochester embayment remedial action plan: Rochester, NY: Monroe County Dept. of Planning and Development 1993 Monroe Conty Dept. of Planning & Development multiple 2v DCBN 05-0341082 gen TD225 R63 R6 1993b v1-2 Water quality management--NYS--Rochester Region--Planning, Water--Pollution--NYS--Rochester Region         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
25 Lake Ontario   Rochester embayment remedial action plan: Carole Beal and Todd Stevenson 1997 Rochester NY: Monroe County Dept. of Health one 3v. DCBN 05-0410357 gen TD225.R63 R6 1997 v2 Water quality management--NYS--Rochester Region--Planning, Water--Pollution--NYS--Rochester Region         SUNY Geneseo http://bufweb2.sunyconnect.suny.edu  
26 Lake Ontario GPO Item No: 250-E-9 IFYGL atlas, Lake Ontario summary data Carl F. Jenkins 1980 US Department of Commerce, Canada Dept of the Enviornment, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory none 336p OCLC: 6922298 Gov Doc: C55.22: L14 o Limnology--Lake Ontario, Lake Ontario--Meteorology         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
27 Lake Ontario GPO Item No: 624-B Ground-water availability in the eastern part of the Lake Ontraio Basin, New York Todd S. Miller 1986 US Geological Survey none 3 maps OCLC: 16318585 Gov Doc: I 19.42/4:86-4201 Water, Underground--Lake Ontario--Maps         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
28 Lake Ontario GPO Item No: 431-I-11 Verification analysis of Lake Ontario and Rochester embayment three dimensional eutrophic models Robert V. Thomann, Richard P. Winfield, and John J. Segna 1979 US Environmental Protection Agency none 136p OCLC: 5793356 Gov Doc: EP 1.23:600/3-79-094 Water quality bioassay--Lake Ontario, Photoplankton--Lake Ontario         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
29 Lake Ontario GPO Item No: 431-I-11 An evaluation of hazardous chamicals in Lake Ontario during IFYGL Fred G Lee 1980 Colorado State Universit none 26p OCLC: 6871687 Gov Doc:EP 1.23:600/3-80-060 Water--Pollution--Lake Ontario, Hazardous Substances--Lake Ontario, Water Quality--Lake Ontario--Measurement         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
30 Lake Ontario GPO Item No: 431-I-11 Algal nutrient availability and limitation in lake Ontario during IFYGL Nagalaxmi Sridharan 1976 University of Texas at Dallas none 1v none Gov Doc: EP 1.23:600/3-76-115 Phosphorus, Nitrogen-fixing alge         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
31 Lake Ontario GPO Item No: 431-I-11 An investigation of the nearshore region of Lake Ontario IFYGL SUNY Buffalo 1976 SUNY Buffalo none 270p OCLC:3226033 Gov Doc: EP 1.23:600/3-76-115 Ecological research--Lake Ontario, Benthos--Lake Ontario, Phytoplankton--Lake Ontario, Marine Sediments--Lake Ontario         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
32 Lake Ontario   Great Lakes water quality: status report on the persisten toxic pollutants in the Lake Ontario basin Great Lakes Water Quality Board 1977 Great Lakes Water Quality Board none 373p OCLC: 12985727 Gov Doc: Y 3.In 8/28:10/976/app.E Water--Pollution--Lake Ontario, Water Quality--Lake Ontario--Measurement         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
33 Lake Ontario GPO Item No: 208-C-2 Lake Ontario Basin runoff modeling Thomas E. Croley and Holly C Hartmann 1983 US Environmental Research Laboratories none 108p OCLC: 9792372 Gov Doc: C55.13/2:ERL GLERL-43 Runoff--Lake Ontario--Mathematical Models         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
34 Lake Ontario   An ecological model for Lake Ontario model formulation, calibration, and preliminary evaluation Donald Scavia, Brian J. Eadie, and Andrew Robertson 1976 Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory none 63p OCLC: 2630162 Gov Doc: C 55.13:ERL 371-GLERL 12 Ecology--Lake Ontario--Models and modelmaking         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
35 Lake Ontario   Lake Ontario beginning-of-month water levels and monthly rates of change of storage Frank Quinn and J.A. Derecki 1976 Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory none 27p OCLC: 2281613 Gov Doc: C 55.13:ERL 365-GLERL 10 Hydrology--Lake Ontario, Great Lakes--Water Level         SUNY Geneseo not available on website  
36 Lake Ontario and ecosystem Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Modeling the interaction of phosphorus control and fishery management in the Lake Ontario ecosystem Rajeev Jain 1996 Thesis     36314000120389 J25m Fishery Management, Fish stocking, Fisheries, Salmon fisheries -Lake Ontario and Phosphorous USA NY   Dissertation Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
37 Lake Ontario and embayment Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Verification analysis of Lake Ontario and Rochester Embayment three dimensional eutrophication models Robert V. Thomann, Richard P. Winfield, John J. Segna, ane project officer:William L. Richardson 1979 United States Environmental Protection Series Ecological Research Series     36314000875966 301.3 U58e Water quality bioassay and Eutrophication - Lake Ontario USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library<  
38 Lake Ontario and hydrology Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Lake Ontario beginning-of-month water levels and monthly rates of change of storage Frank H. Quinn and Jan A. Derecki 1976 Environmental Research Laboratories     mq67114 NOAA TR ERL 365-GLERL10 Hydrology-Ontario Lake and Great Lakes Water Level USA NY   Technical Report Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
39 Lake Ontario and lake level Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Lake Ontario and and the St. Lawrence River: analysis of and recommendations concernig high water levels Danile J. Palm 1975 St. Lawrence-Eastern Ontario Commision       627.1097 P171L   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
40 Lake Ontario and algae Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Great Lakes Alive David Way, David Hazzan, Ted Remerowski, Ken Hillier, Paul Boisvert, Paul Spencer, Angela Fusco, and Brad MacDonald 1996 Films for the Humanities-Ontario Eduacational Communications Authority       363.7394 G786 Lake Ontario USA NY   Videocassette Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
41 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Agricultural NPS control of phosphorous in the New York State, Lake Ontario basin Patricia Longabucco 1991 United States Environmental Protection Agency-Great Lakes National Program Office v.1-3     EP 1.2:AG 8/8 pollution, Oak Orchard Creek, soils(NY)-phosphorous content, water pollution control industry(Ontario Lake, NY), Water(NY)-phosphorous content USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
42 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Ground-water availability in the eastern part of the Lake Ontario Basin, New York Todd S. Miller 1986 US Geological Survey - Temporary State Commission on Tug Hill v.4 86-4052   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
43 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Geophysical well-log analysis of fractured crystalline rocks at East Bull Lake, Ontario, Canada F.L. Paillet and Alfred E. Hess 1986 US Geological Survey - Temporary State Commission on Tug Hill v.4 86-4052   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
44 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Great Lakes National Program Office, Harbor Sediment Program, Lake Ontario 1981 Anthony G. Kizlauskas, Roger E. Claff, and David C. Rockwell 1984 Great Lakes National Program Office       EP 2.2:H 21 Oswego Harbor USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
45 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Algal nutrient availability and limitation in Lake Ontario during IFYGL US EPA, IFYGL, and Univ. of Texas at Dallas 1976-1977 US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development       301.3 U58ed Precipitation(Meteorology), Runoff, Algae, and Phoshorous USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library Pt.1-Available phosphorous in urban runoff and Lake Ontario tributary waters-Pt.2-Nitrogen availability in Lake Ontario tributary water samples and urban runoff from Madison, Wiscoonsin-Pt.3-Algal nutrient limitation in Lake Ontario during IFYGL
46 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Coastal Resources/St. Lawrence- Eastern Ontario Commission Joseph A. Romola 1976 St. Lawrence-Eastern Ontario Commision       333.917 N532c Conservation of Natural Resources, Coastal Zone Management, and Shore Protection USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
47 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac IFYGL rawinsonde system: description of archived data Sandr M. Hoexter 1976 Center for Experimental Design and Data Analysis       NOAA TR EDS 14   USA NY   Technical Paper- Reports Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
48 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Mathematical Modeling of phytoplankton in Lake Ontario Robert V. Thomann et al. 1975 National Environmental Research Center       627.1097 P171L   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
49 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Phytoplankton composition and abundance in Lake Ontario during IFYGL Eugene F. Stoermer et al. 1975 International Field Year for the Great Lakes       301.3 U58e no.4   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
50 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Annotated bibliography of Lake Ontario limnological and related studies National Environmenatl Research, Corvallis 1973 US EPA Office of Research and Monitoring       301.3 U58e no.28a limnology USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
51 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac The role of sludge worms in eutrophication Ralph O. Brinkhurst 1972 US EPA Office of Reasearch and Monitoring       301.3 U58e no.4   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
52 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Pollution of Lake Ontario, Lake Ontario and the international section of the St. Lawrence River   1909-1970 International Joint Commission (US and Canada)       628.1680977 I61p   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
53 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Water pollution problems and improvement needs:Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River Basins US Dept. of the Interior, Federal Water Pollution Control Administration, Great Lakes Region, and NY State Dept. of Health 1968 US Federal Water Pollution Control Administration- Division of Pure Waters       628.16867479 U58wp   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
54 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Regulation of Lake Ontario: Plan 1958-D: report to the International Joint Commission International St. Lawrence River Board of Control 1909-1963 International St. Lawrence River Board Control and International Joint Commission (US and Canada)       627.1097 I61r   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
55 Lake Ontario Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Regulation of outflows and levels of Lake Ontario, Method no. 5: St. Lawrence waterway project Guy A. Lindsay 1952 Dept. of Transport (Ottowa, Ontario)-Special Project Branch       627.1097 R344   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
56 Oswego Harbor Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Harbor and nearshore currents, Oswego Harbor, New York Gerald S. Miller 1976 Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory       NOAA TR ERL 360-GLERL 7   USA NY   Technical Reports- Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
57 Oswego River Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Computation of inflows and outflows of eight regulated lakes in the Oswego River basin, New York, 1930-79 Richard Lumia and Richard B. Moore 1983 US Army Corps of Engineers- Geological Surveys v.4 82-4112   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
58 Oswego River Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Chemical quality of ground water in the western Oswego River basin, New York Leslie J. Cain 1975 NY State Department of Environmental Conservation and Wa-Ont-Ya Basin Regional Water Resources Planning Boards       553.78 C886c   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
59 Oswego River Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Ground-water resources of the western Oswego River basin, New York Leslie J. Cain 1974 NY State Department of Environmental Conservation and Wa-Ont-Ya Basin Regional Water Resources Planning Boards       553.79097478 C887g   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
60 Oswego River Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Chemical quality to surface water in the Eastern Oswego River Basin, New York William J. Shampine 1973 NY State Department of Environmental Conservation and Eastern Oswego Regional Water Resources Planning Board       628.16 S528c   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
61 Oswego River Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Ground-water resources of the western Oswego River basin, New York I.H. Kantrowitz 1970 NY State Division of Water Resources- Eastern Oswego Regional Water Resources Planning Board       551.49 K16g   USA NY   Book Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
62 Sandy Creek Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Determination of the contributing area to six municipal ground-water supplies in the Tug Hill glacial aquifer of northern New York, with emphasis on the Lacona-Sandy Creek well field Phillip J. Zarriello 1993 Water-resources investigation report- Geological Survey (US) v.4 90-4145 36314002827775 I19.42 Grounwater flow(NY)-Tug Hill Aquifer/Tug Hill Region and Hydrogeology(NY)-Tug Hill Aquafier/Tug Hill Region USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
63 Johnson Creek Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Atlas of eleven selected aquifers in New York Roger M. Waller and Anne J. Finch 1982 NY State Department of Health, Bureau of Public Water Supply Protection , Geological Survey (US) v.4 82-553   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
64 Irondequoit Bay Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Water resources of Monroe County, NY, water years 1989-93, with emphasis on water quality in the Irondequoit Creek Basin Donald A. Sherwood 1999- Monroe County(NY) Department of Health-Geological Survey (US) v.4 99-4084 (pt.2)   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
65 Irondequoit Bay Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Water resources of Monroe County, NY, water years 1994-96, with emphasis on water quality in the Irondequoit Creek Basin:atmospheric deposition, ground water, streamflow, trends in water quality, and chemical loads to Irondequoit Bay Donald A. Sherwood 1999- Monroe County(NY) Department of Health-Geological Survey (US) v.4 0-4201   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
66 Irondequoit Bay Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Water resources of Monroe County, NY, water years 1984-88, with emphasis on water quality in the Irondequoit Creek Basin. Part 2, Atmospheric deposition, ground water, stream flow, trends in water quailty, and chemical loads to Irondeqouit Bay William H. Johnston and Donal A. Sherwood 1996 Monroe County(NY) Department of Health-Geological Survey (US) v.4 96-4054   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
67 Irondequoit Bay Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Changes in chloride concentrations, mixing patterns, and stratification characteristics of Irondequoit Bay, Monroe County, New York, after decreased use of road-deicing salts, 1974-1984 Robert C. Bubeck and Richard S. Burton 1989 Monroe County(NY) Department of Health-Geological Survey (US) v.4 87-4223   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
68 Irondequoit Bay Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Quantity and quality of urban storm runoff in the Irondequoit Creek basin near Rochester, NY. Quality of storm runoff and atmospheric deposition, rainfall-runoff-quality modeling and potential of wetlands for sediment and nutrient retention William M. Kappel, Phillip J. Zarrielo, and Richard M. Yager 1986 Monroe County(NY) Department of Engineering-Geological Survey (US) and Irondequoit Bay Pure Waters District v.4 85-4113   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
69 Irondequoit Bay Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Geohydrology of the Irondequoit Creek Basin near Rochester, New York Richard M. Yager, William M. Kappel, and Phillip J. Zarriello 1985 Monroe County(NY) Department of Engineering-Geological Survey (US) and Irondequoit Bay Pure Waters District v.4 84-4259   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
70 Genesse River Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Genesse River Watershed study microform: for US Environmental Protection Agency   1991 NY State Department of Environmental Conservationstyle="mso-spacerun: yes"> and Bureau of Technical Services and Research United States v.1/SUM     EP 1.2:G 28/2   USA NY   US Governments Documents- Microfiche Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
71 Genesse River Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Ground-water availability in the Genesse River Basin, New York and Pennsylvania John C. Kammerer and William A. Hobba 1986 Genesse/FL Regional Planning Council and Department of the Interioir-Geological Survey(US) v.4 86-4048   I 19.42   USA NY   US Government Documents - Paper Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
72 Genesse River Clarkson Library Catalog- http://ipac.clarkson.edu/ipac-cgi/ipac Summary of water-resource records at principal measurement sites in the Genesse River basin through 1963 Bruce K. Gilbert and John Craig Kammerer 1965 Geological Survey (US)       551.483   USA NY     Clarkson University www.clarkson.edu/library  
73 Lake Ontario, Glaciolacustrine sediment; Laurentide Ice Sheet; Mazinaw Lake; Kettle basin Research article Acoustic architecture of glaciolacustrine sediments deformed during zonal stagnation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet; Mazinaw Lake, Ontario, Canada Eyles N.[1]; Doughty M.; Boyce J.I.; Mullins H.T.; Halfman J.D.; Koseoglu B. 2003 Sedimentary Geology Vol 157, no. 1 pp. 133-151(19) 0037-0738 DOI (article): 10.1016/S0037-0738(02)00229-4style="mso-spacerun: yes">
SICI (online): 0037-07381571133151
          SUNY Oswego Ingenta In North America, the last (Laurentide) Ice Sheet retreated from much of the Canadian Shield by 'zonal stagnation'. Masses of dead ice, severed from the main ice sheet by emerging bedrock highs, downwasted in situ within valleys and lake basins and were commonly buried by sediment. Consequently, the flat sediment floors of many valleys and lakes are now pitted by steep-sided, enclosed depressions (kettle basins) that record the melt of stagnant ice blocks and collapse of sediment. At Mazinaw Lake in eastern Ontario, Canada, high-resolution seismic reflection, magnetic and bathymetric surveys, integrated with onland outcrop and hammer seismic investigations, were conducted to identify the types of structural disturbance associated with the formation of kettle basins in glaciolacustrine sediments. Basins formed as a result of ice blocks being trapped within a regionally extensive proglacial lake (Glacial Lake Iroquois ~12,500 to 11,400 years BP) that flooded eastern Ontario during deglaciation. Kettles occur within a thick (>30 m) succession of parallel, high-frequency acoustic facies consisting of rhythmically laminated (varved?) Iroquois silty-clays. Iroquois strata underlying and surrounding kettle basins show large-scale normal faults, fractures, rotational failures and incoherent chaotically bedded sediment formed by slumping and collapse. Mazinaw Lake lies along part of the Ottawa Graben and while neotectonic earthquake activity cannot be entirely dismissed, deformation is most likely to have occurred as a result of the rapid melt of buried ice blocks. Seismic data do not fully penetrate the entire basin sediment fill but the structure and topography of bedrock can be inferred from magnetometer data. The location and shape of buried ice masses was closely controlled by the graben-like form of the underlying bedrock surface.
74 Lake Ontario, Nickel; Rainbow trout; Waterborne; Respiratory toxicity; Ionoregulation Reasearch Article Acute waterborne nickel toxicity in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) occurs by a respiratory rather than ionoregulatory mechanism Pane E.F.[1]; Richards J.G.; Wood C.M. 2003 Aquatic Toxicology Vol. 63, no. 1 pp. 65-82(18) 0166-445X SICI (online): 0166-445X6316582           SUNY Oswego Ingenta The acute mechanism of toxicity of waterborne nickel (Ni) was investigated in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in moderately hard (~140 mg/l as CaCO3 ) Lake Ontario water, where the 96-h LC50 for juvenile trout (1.5-3.5 g) was 15.3 mg (12.7-19.0, 95% C.L.) dissolved Ni/l . No marked impact of Ni exposure on average unidirectional or net fluxes of Na+, Cl-, or Ca2+ was observed in juvenile trout exposed for 48-60 h to 15.6 mg Ni/l as NiSO4. Furthermore, when adult rainbow trout (200-340 g) were fitted with indwelling dorsal aortic catheters and exposed for 117 h to 11.6 mg Ni/l as NiSO4 , plasma ions (Na+, Cl-, Ca2+, and Mg2+) were all well conserved. However, mean arterial oxygen tension dropped gradually to ~35% of control values. This drop in P aO2 was accompanied by an acidosis primarily of respiratory origin. P aCO2 rose to more than double control values with a concomitant drop in arterial pH of 0.15 units. Acute respiratory toxicity was further evidenced by a significant increase in hematocrit (Ht), and plasma lactate, and a significant decrease in spleen hemoglobin (Hb). Following 117 h of exposure to 11.6 mg Ni/l, the gill, intestine, plasma, kidney, stomach, and heart accumulated Ni significantly, with increases of 60, 34, 28, 11, 8, and 3-fold, respectively. Brain, white muscle, liver, and bile did not significantly accumulate Ni. Plasma Ni exhibited a remarkable linear increase with time to levels approximately 30-fold higher than controls. We conclude that in contrast to most other metals, Ni is primarily a respiratory, rather than an ionoregulatory, toxicant at exposure levels close to the 96-h LC50 The implications of a waterborne metal as an acute respiratory toxicant (as opposed to ionoregulatory toxicants such as Cu, Ag, Cd, or Zn) with respect to toxicity modeling are discussed
75 Lake Ontario Reasearch Article The mobility of radium-226 and trace metals in pre-oxidized subaqueous uranium mill tailings Martin A.J.[1]; Crusius J.; Jay McNee J.; Yanful E.K. 2003 Applied Geochemisty vol. 18, no. 7 pp. 1095-1110(16) 0883-2927 SICI (online): 0883-292718710951110
          Suny Oswego Ingenta The exchange of 226 Ra and trace metals across the tailings-water interface and the mechanisms governing their mobility were assessed via sub-centimetre resolution profiling of dissolved constituents across the tailings-water interface in Cell 14 of the Quirke Waste Management Area at Rio Algom's Quirke Mine, near Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada. Shallow zones (<1.5 m water depth) are characterized by sparse filamentous vegetation, well-mixed water columns and fully oxygenated bottom waters. Profiles of dissolved O 2 , Fe and Mn indicate that the tailings deposits in these areas are sub-oxic below tailings depths of ~3 cm. These zones exhibit minor remobilization of Ra in the upper 5 cm of the tailings deposit; 226 Ra fluxes at these sites are relatively small, and contribute negligibly to the water column activity of 226 Ra. The shallow areas also exhibit minor remobilization of Ni, As, Mo and U. The release of these elements to the water cover is, however, limited by scavenging mechanisms in the interfacial oxic horizons. The presence of thick vegetation (Chara sp.) in the deeper areas (>2 m water depth) fosters stagnant bottom waters and permits the development of anoxia above the benthic boundary. These anoxic tailings are characterized by substantial remobilization of 226 Ra, resulting in a relatively large flux of 226Ra from the tailings to the water column. The strong correlation between the porewater profiles of 226 Ra and Ba (r2=0.99), as well as solubility calculations, indicate that the mobility of Ra is controlled by saturation with respect to a poorly ordered and/or impure barite phase [(Ra,Ba)SO4 ]. In the anoxic zones, severe undersaturation with respect to barite is sustained by microbial SO4 reduction. Flux calculations suggest that the increase in 226Ra activity in the water cover since 1995 (from <0.5 to 2.5 Bq/l ) can be attributed to an increase in the spatial distribution of anoxic bottom waters caused by increased density of benthic flora. The anoxic, vegetated areas also exhibit minor remobilization with respect to dissolved As, Ni and Zn. The removal of trace metals in the anoxic bottom waters appears to be limited by the availability of free sulphide. Collectively, the data demonstrate that while the water cover over the U mill tailings minimizes sulphide oxidation and metal mobility, anoxic conditions which have developed in deeper areas have led to increased mobility of 226 Ra
76 Lake Ontario, exchange flows; hydrodynamic and transport modelling; lakes; harbours; water quality Reasearch Article Numerical models of the exchange flows between Hamilton Harbour and Lake Ontario Hamblin P.F.; He C. 2003 Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering vol. 30, no.1 pp. 168-180(13) 1208-6029 SICI (online): 1208-6029301168180           SUNY Oswego Ingenta Accurate simulations of the flow and the transport of water quality constituents in such coastal zones of large lakes as the western end of Lake Ontario and Hamilton Harbour are needed to assess the impact on pollutant levels of cleanup operations and sewage diversions. Coastal models in temperate zone lakes are classified in terms of density stratification, uniform in winter and stratified during summer. During the winter period a 1-D model of the flow between a lake and adjacent harbour is shown to agree favourably with advanced acoustic measurements of the flow in the connecting passage, but does not account for the observed winter buildup of salinity in the harbour. A calibrated 2-D hydrodynamic and salt transport model is used to show that significant exchange does not take place unless the excursion of the inflow is several times greater than the length of the connecting channel, an infrequent occurrence. The exchange is also shown to depend on the flow field at the entrances of the channel. In summer a 1-D vertical model illustrates the dramatic effect of the inflow from Lake Ontario on hypolimnetic temperatures of the harbour. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic and temperature–salt transport models are validated by extensive field observations taken in 1996. The stratified exchange is much stronger than its winter counterpart and more steady. Winter exchange is forced by short-term water level fluctuations, whereas summer or stratified exchange by slowly fluctuating density contrasts between the two water bodies. Key words : exchange flows,hydrodynamic and transport modelling, lakes, harbours, water quality.
77 Lake Ontario Reasearch Article Molecular and isotopic characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distribution and sources at the international segment of the St. Lawrence River Stark&unknown; A.; Abrajano T.[1]; Hellou J.; Metcalf-Smith J. 2003 Organic Geochemistry vol. 34, no. 2 pp. 225-237(13) 0146-6380 SICI (online): 0146-6380342225237           SUNY Oswego Ingenta This paper documents the molecular and compound-specific carbon isotope composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in St. Lawrence River sediments from the outflow of Lake Ontario (Kingston, ON) to the Massena area (NY). The sediment inventory of PAH is characterized by the dominance of 4 to 6 ring parent compounds, with the PAH ranging from 0.8 to 6700 g/g. The high abundance of high molecular weight parent compounds, high parent/alkylated PAH ratios and 13C-enriched values recorded for individual PAH are consistent with a dominant combustion PAH source for the sediments upstream of the Massena area, but areas receiving higher petroleum contributions were also identified (e.g., Prescott-Ogdensburg, Cornwall). PAH contribution from aluminum smelting operations in the Massena area is pronounced in the southern bank of the St. Lawrence River, where sediment samples display the highest PAH and higher 13C values for three ring PAH than for sediments immediately upstream. Thus, sediments at the international segment of the St. Lawrence River show localized enrichments in petroleum-related and aluminum smelter contributions against the regional backdrop of combustion-dominated PAH sources in sediments.
78 Lake Ontario Reasearch Article Recent Trends In Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Assel R.[1]; Cronk K.[2]; Norton D.[1] 2003 Climatic Change vol. 57, no. 1 pp. 185-204(20) 0165-0009 SICI (online): 0165-0009571185204           SUNY Oswego Ingenta A 39-winter (1963–2001) record of annual maximum ice concentration (AMIC), the maximum fraction of lake surface area covered by ice each year, is analyzed for each Great Lake. Lake Erie has the largest median AMIC (94%) followed by Lakes Superior (80%), Huron (63%), Michigan (33%), and Ontario (21%). The frequency distribution of AMICs is negatively skewed for Lakes Superior and Erie and positively skewed for Lakes Michigan and Ontario. Temporal and spatial patterns of typical and extreme AMICs is presented within the context of long-term average air temperatures and lake bathymetry. The variation of spatially averaged ice concentration with discrete depth ranges are discussed for each lake for the upper and lower end of the typical range of AMIC values. In general, ice concentration decreases with increasing depth ranges for a given winter. A decrease in the gradient of ice concentration with depths was also observed with an increase in the AMIC from winter 1983 to winter 1984. A temporal trend in the AMICs supports the hypothesis of three ice cover regimes over the past 39 winters. Approximately 44% of the highest quartile (10 highest) AMICs for the Great Lakes occurred during the 6-winter period: 1977–1982 providing evidence of a higher ice cover regime during this period relative to the 14 winters before them (1963–1976) and the 19 winters after them (1983–2001). Winter 1998 established new low AMIC extremes, and the AMIC averaged over the 1998–2001 winters is the lowest for the period of record on four of the five Great Lakes. These recent trends taken together are noteworthy as they may be harbingers of a period of even lower AMICs in the 21st Century.
79 Oswego River, salinity; stratification; oxygen depletion; ionic waste; river
Regular paper EFFECT OF REDUCED SALINITY INPUT ON RIVER STRATIFICATION AND DISSOLVED OXYGEN EFFLER S.W.[1]; DOERR S.M.[1]; OWENS E.M.[2] 1997 Water, Air, and Soil Pollution vol. 95, no. 1/4 pp. 45-58(12) 0049-6979 SICI (online): 0049-6979951/44558           SUNY Oswego Ingenta Changes in the occurrence, character, and longitudinal extent of salinity (S) stratification, and related impacts on dissolved oxygen (DO), in the Seneca and Oswego Rivers, NY, in response to the abatement of ionic pollution of inflowing Onondaga Lake, is documented. The analysis is based on vertical profiles of specific conductance and DO collected over a 20 km reach of the river system for several years before and after the closure of the source of the ionic pollution, a soda ash manufacturing facility. The S difference between the lake and the Seneca River decreased from about 2.6 to 0.7 parts per thousand following the closure; more than 50% of the continuing difference is associated with lingering ionic waste loading from soda ash production. The occurrence and longitudinal range of the S stratification phenomenon was, and continues to be, highly dependent on river flow. It is most strongly manifested when river flow is low. The occurrence, magnitude, and longtitudinal extent of S stratification have decreased, and vertical exchange between the stratified layers has increased, since the closure, thereby ameliorating the coupled negative impact on the river's oxygen resources. However, under low flow conditions (e.g., probability of occurrence equal to 15%) S stratification continues to extent > 2 km upstream and > 8 km downstream of the point of entry of Onondaga Lake into the Seneca River. Severe DO depletion in the lowel river layer, representing violations of New York water quality standards, continues to occur where S stratification prevails. Elimination of the continuing ionic waste inputs from soda ash production would further limit the stratification phenomenon and improve the river's DO problem.
80 Oswego River Reasearch article Modelling the fate of PCBS and Mirex in aquatic ecosystems using the TOXFATE model Halfon E.; Allan R.J. 1995 Environment International vol. 21, no. 5 pp. 557-569(13) 0160-4120 DOI (article): 10.1016/0160-4120(95)00058-S           SUNY Oswego Ingenta Predictive modelling of the fate of two persistent toxic organic chemicals, PCBs and Mirex, is discussed in light of the results from oceanographic scale investigations from the Niagara River to Lake Ontario, to the St. Lawrence River Estuary aquatic ecosystem. A mathematical model, TOXFATE, is used to run simulations of the fate of Mirex in Lake Ontario, a relatively small part of the total system, using a mass balance approach. TOXFATE features simulations of the fate of Mirex in lake water, plankton, benthos, suspended and bottom sediments, small and large fish (sculpins and salmonids). A friendly user interface (TOXSHELL) facilitates running the program on microcomputers. Concentrations of ''dissolved'' (the fraction not removed by high-speed centrifugation) persistent toxic organic chemicals in the Niagara River are in the ng/l or ng m-3 range, yet, the total load transported into Lake Ontario can be considerable given the high discharge of some 6000 m 3 sec-1. The river draining Lake Ontario is the St. Lawrence, and PCB loads actually double due to the various sources along the river. The insecticide and flame retardant, Mirex was essentially introduced from only two point sources, the Niagara and Oswego Rivers. The chemical is still detectable some 1000 km downstream of the main site near Niagara Falls of its original introduction to this river-lake-estuary system. The system's recovery from Mirex pollution is related to the major natural aquatic processes of the system and is not compounded by continuing point and non-point source inputs. Simulations show the fast response of Mirex concentration in water following a reduction in loadings in the early 1960s and a much slower reaction of bottom sediments and fish to the same loadings reduction
81     An Investigation of the nearshore region of Lake Ontario, IFYGL Duluth, Minn. : Environmental Research Laboratory-Duluth, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1976         TD223.3.I7  Lake Ontario         RIT    
82     A biological survey of the Oswegatchie and Black river systems New York (State). Conservation Dept 1931         SH35.N7 A5 1931 Lake Ontario         RIT    
83     Observations on the Inhabitants, Climate, Soil, Rivers, Productions, Animals, and Other Matters Worthy….. Bartram, John 1999         On-Line Books Page electronic books Lake Ontario         RIT    
84     Rochester embayment remedial action plan : draft stage I Rochester, N.Y. : The Dept., 1993 Jan-93         TD225.R63 R6 1993 v.1 Lake Ontario embayment         RIT    
85     Rochester embayment remedial action plan : draft stage I Rochester, N.Y. : The Dept., 1993 Jan-93         TD225.R63 R6 1993  v.2  Lake Ontario embayment         RIT    
86     Rochester embayment remedial action plan stage II : [final report], September 1997 Rochester, N.Y. : Monroe County Dept. of Health Jan. 1997         TD225.R63 R6 1997b  v.1 Lake Ontario embayment         RIT    
87     Rochester embayment remedial action plan stage II : [final report], September 1997 Rochester, N.Y. : Monroe County Dept. of Health Jan. 1997         TD225.R63 R6 1997b  v.2  Lake Ontario embayment         RIT    
88     Rochester embayment remedial action plan stage II : [final report], September 1997 Rochester, N.Y. : Monroe County Dept. of Health Jan. 1997         TD225.R63 R6 1997b  v.3  Lake Ontario embayment         RIT    
89     Rochester embayment remedial action plan stage II : [final report], September 1997 Rochester, N.Y. : Monroe County Dept. of Health Jan. 1997          TD225.R63 R6 1997b  v.4  Lake Ontario embayment         RIT    
90     State of the Lake Ontario Ecosystem: Introduction to an ecosystem perspective on a vital resource DePinto, JV 1991       0706-652X   Lake Ontario ecosystem         RIT    
91     Bringing science to the lakeshore Voiland, MP 1991 N.Y. FOOD LIFE SCI. Q vol. 19, no. 4 pp. 28-31     Lake Ontario ecosystem         RIT    
92     Lake Ontario fishery management: The lake trout restoration issue Lange, RE; Smith, PA 1995       0380-1330   Lake Ontario ecosystem         RIT    

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